The Newport Tower

The Newport Tower
Medieval stone tower ... in Rhode Island. Does it look like any other Colonial structure you've seen? Recent carbon dating of the mortar indicates 1400s construction date (see post below).

The Westford Knight Sword

The Westford Knight Sword
Medieval Battle Sword ... in Westford, Massachusetts. Can anyone deny the pommel, hilt and blade punch-marked into the bedrock?

The Spirit Pond Rune Stone

The Spirit Pond Rune Stone
Medieval Inscription ... in Maine, near Popham Beach. Long passed off as a hoax, but how many people know the Runic language? And how is it that some of the Runic characters match rare runes on inscriptions found in Minnesota and Rhode Island? Carbon-dating of floorboards at nearby long house date to 1405.

The Narragansett Rune Stone

The Narragansett Rune Stone
Medieval Inscription ... in Rhode Island's Narragansett Bay. This Runic inscription is only visible for twenty minutes a day at low tide--is this also the work of a modern-day, Runic-speaking hoaxster?

The Westford Boat Stone

The Westford Boat Stone
Medieval Ship Carving ... in Westford, MA. Found near the Westford Knight site. Weathering patterns of carving are consistent with that of 600-year-old artifact. And why would a Colonial trail-marker depict a knorr, a 14th-century ship?

The Kensington Rune Stone

The Kensington Rune Stone
Medieval Inscription... in Minnesota. Forensic geology confirms the carvings predate European settlement of Minnesota--so did Runic-speaking Native Americans carve it?

The Hooked X Rune

The Hooked X Rune
Medieval Runic Character ... on inscriptions found in Maine, Minnesota and Rhode Island. But this rare rune was only recently found in Europe. This conclusively disproves any hoax theory while also linking these three artifacts together.

Monday, April 29, 2013

Narragansett Rune Stone Recovered

Happy to report that the Narragansett Rune Stone has been recovered by RI authorities working with the RI Attorney General. The artifact, a large boulder sitting in Narragansett Bay, had been removed/stolen last summer, purportedly by an abutting land owner who apparently didn't appreciate its possible connections to ancient exploration of the area. The good news is that, now that the boulder is on land, the artifact can be preserved and studied. Here's a short article:

http://eastgreenwich.patch.com/articles/narragansett-rune-stone-returned-to-be-tested#photo-14125930

14 comments:

Jason Hawke - said...

Frankly, given the man's attitude, I'm a little surprised he didn't destroy it. Or, at least, contrive to obliterate the markings.

David Brody said...

Jason, I think he wanted it more as a trophy...

Anonymous said...

No prosecution will be attempted, but if you pick up just one of thousands of broken native arrowheads on any state land they will definitely write you up !
Sounds like this guy has friends in the right places!

Anonymous said...

Sound like BS to me, he was going to sell it, or make money on it in some way.

Jessica O'Neal said...

Where is the stone at now?

David Brody said...

Jessica, the stone is currently in storage, but should soon find a home in a park in North Kingstown, RI.

Tyler Lysy said...

With its connection to Templar Knights it should be studied to unlock what secrets it holds. It very well maybe a clue to the holy grail.

David Brody said...

Tyler, the carving has been studied extensively. One of the main reasons for preserving it is to allow for future study as technology advances.

Anonymous said...

my ass is farts

Darryl Ricketts said...

This is all nonsense. The Newport tower was built in the late 1600s, as confirmed through carbon-14 dating. There is absolutely no resemblance to any known Viking structure, but there have been several notable light houses built in the same archetype. Narragansett rune stone was card by a gentleman in the area in the 60s, he's already confessed to it. In the Kensington room stone was carved by Oloff in the late 1800s. The Swedish being used was not even invented in the 13th and 14th centuries. How convenient that a stone of Swedish origin in the middle of the United States was discovered by a swede?!? By the way, I am an anthropologist and archaeologist, so please don't tell me I don't know what I'm talking about. Follow the science, not the hopeful wishes of those making history channel pseudo documentaries.

David Brody said...

Nonsense is a strong word, Mr. Ricketts. I will not get into a point-by-point debate with you, since obviously you have made up your mind on these matters. As Epictetus said, a man cannot learn what he thinks he already knows. But I will point out that history is always changing, and that archeologists have often been proven wrong in their conclusions. The L'Anse Aux Meadow discovery in the 1960s (when many so-called experts believed the Norse Sagas to be mere legend), proving Viking travel to North America, is one example. The Gobekli Tepe site in Turkey, effectively doubling the age of "civilization," is another. I do agree with you that we should follow the science as it will most likely lead us to the truth.

Anonymous said...

I don't think any of the stones are hoaxes. Who would go to such lengths, and for what purpose?

David Brody said...

Re the possibility of hoaxes: A man recently claimed to have carved the Narragansett Rune Stone in the 1950s or 1960s as a hoax. He was later discredited by local residents who vouched for an earlier existence. Fortunately these neighbors came forward. Often the weathering patterns within the carved surfaces can be used to estimate an artifact's age and reveal any modern hoaxes.

Anonymous said...

Mr. Ricketts fails to note that the Kensington rune stone contained the hooked X, which was not known or discovered until much later, Olof did not and could not have known about it
So typical of armchair professionals who dis eveything presented which their college professors did not teach them.
Like they old saying goes, "Save it for the intern"